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/ BARNES NOBLE GENEVA DEC 4 /BARNES NOBLE BOLINGBROOK DEC 18 PROSPECT HEIGHTS LIBRARY TITANIC PRESENTATION NOV 30 7PM 

'Bestselling author Hazelgrove brings a sensational tale little-told in the modern day to new readers in stunning detail.'
— Booklist on The Brilliant Con of Cassie Chadwick 

 

PROSPECT HEIGHTS LIBRARY TITANIC NOV 30 7PM 

ROUNDLAKE LIBRARY TITANIC 6 PM VIRTUAL 

OAK PARK LIBRARY TITANIC 7 PM VIRUTAL 

 

 

 

William Hazelgrove is the National Bestselling author of ten novels and ten nonfiction titles. His books have received starred reviews in Publisher Weekly Kirkus, Booklist, Book of the Month Selections, ALA Editors Choice Awards Junior Library Guild Selections, Literary Guild Selections, History Book Club Selections, History Book Club Bestsellers, Distinguished Book Awarrd. and optioned for the movies. He was the Ernest Hemingway Writer in Residence where he wrote in the attic of Ernest Hemingway’s birthplace. He has written articles and reviews for USA Today, The Smithsonian Magazine, and other publications and has been featured on NPR All Things Considered. The New York Times, LA Times, Chicago Tribune, CSPAN, USA Today have all covered his books with features.  His book Madam President The Secret Presidency of Edith  in development He has two forthcoming books.  The Brilliant Con of Cassie Chadwick and Writing Gatsby. 

WGN CHICAGO TV INTERVIEW ON ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY MINUTES THE RACE TO SAVE THE RMS TITANIC 

 
PUBLISHERS WEEKLY REVIEW OF THE BRILLIANT CON OF CASSIE CHADWICK 

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY FEATURE ON THE BRILLIANT CON OF CASSIE CHADWICK 

Media Coverage Chicago Tribune, WGN Radio, WGN Television Chicago, WLS, WBBM News Radio, Daily Express UK, Irish Daily Star 
Five Star Review of One Hundred and Sixty Minutes

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY MINUTES THE RACE TO SAVE THE RMS TITANICThe Incredible Not Told Story that Shows No One Should Have Died on the Night Titanic SankBy William HazelgroveTALKING POINTS *On the Night of August 14 1912 The RMS Titanic Struck an iceberg with only 160 minutes before she sank beneath the waves. We have been told from Titanic mythology her fate was sealed and no one could have saved the 1521 people. The real story is that every one who froze in the North Atlantic could have been saved if it were not for human failing*The First Class passengers who entered the rowboats were told to ROW TOWARD A LIGHT that was so close Captain Smith told the passengers it was a ship coming to their rescue. Titanic then began morsing the ship with a lantern and sending up rockets. The ship was the RMS Californian commanded by Captain Lord who had gone to bed and his wireless operator had turned off his set. *The two wireless operators sent out SOS signals that reached New York and New Jersey and no less than ten ships that turned toward Titanic. One of the first ships was the MT Temple commanded by Captain Moore. The Mt Temple reached the Titanic while she was still floating with rockets shooting into the sky. Captain Moore then refused to enter the icefield and save the Titanic. Officers on board the Californian watched Titanic sinking and saw her distress rockets. They woke Captain Lord up and pointed them out and he denied it was the Titanic even after he asked the wireless operator if there were any ships in the area and he told him only the Titanic. Captain Lord forbid anyone to speak of what they were seeing and left the officers to watch Titanic sink in front of them. The California was only ten miles away. The lifeboats were less than half full and comprised of mostly First Class Passengers. Another 400 people could have been rescued if they had returned but only one boat went back. The other twenty lifeboats watched as 1521 people drowned and froze to death in front of them. Only Captain Rostrom of the Carpathia came to the rescue of Titanic from Fifty Miles away zigzagging around icebergs but he was too late to save the 1500 people in the water. Newspapers interviewed the crew of the California and the Mount Temple along with passengers. Captain Lord was found guilty in British and American inquiries of not going to the rescue of a ship in distress and was disgraced. Captain Moore escaped the inquiries but history has finally caught up with him after voluminous testimonials by a crew that contemplated mutiny and passengers who were forbidden to go up on deck but snuck up and saw the Titanic sinking. One Hundred and Sixty Minutes the Race to Save the RMS TitanicThe Incredible Not Told Story that Shows No One Should Have Died on the Night Titanic SankBy William HazelgroveQuestions and AnswersCould everyone really have been saved on the Titanic?Yes. Titanic mythology established by Walter Lords book A Night To Remember established a floor of the great tragedy that was immediately wrapped in the cloak of the Great White Male mythology. The band played. The gentlemen sent off their wives and children before a final shot of brady and a cigar and then went down “ready to die as gentlemen.” Nothing could be further from the truth. The real story is one of human failing that is the opposite of the Heroic White Male Mythology. The sad truth is that of the 1521 people who drowned in the North Atlantic all of them could have been saved. The RMS California was only ten miles away and the Mount Temple reached Titanic before she went down. Both ships could have easily taken on the passengers who ended up going down with the ship. Why didn’t the California and the Mount Temple Save the People then? Human failing. A lack of courage. Call it what you will but the California was only ten miles away so close people were told to row toward her but she never came any closer. Captain Lord was imperious and his word was law and he denied that the ship he and his officers were watching sinking into the Atlantic was the Titanic and that the rockets were not distress rockets. Lord refused to enter the icefield and risk his own ship to rescue the Titanic. Captain Moore reached Titanic and stopped at the edge of the icefield. Passengers and crew saw the Titanic sinking with rockets shooting into the sky but Moore refused to go any closer even though his own crew considered a mutiny. Both men lacked the courage to go help a fellow ship in distress at the crucial moment. Why Havent We heard this before?Titanic mythology. The newspapers did not have information when Titanic was sinking and so they made many things up. The tragedy was of such a magnitude that it had to be wrapped in a heroic veil that would make it more palatable. It was simply not acceptable to say that the Titanic went down in front of two different captains, two different ships, that could have come to her rescue. Better to say she was out there all alone and the people acted with decorum and grace and proved that the best in human beings was still predominant. When Walter Lords book came out in 1959 this cemented the heroic ideal by quoting directly from the survivors. Why didn’t the people in the lifeboats return and rescue those who were drowning?Again. Human failing and class prerogative. The lifeboats were comprised of First Class Passengers. Many of the boats were less than half full yet no one returned to help their fellow passengers drowning in front of them. Some wanted to but were overruled by those who said the boats would be swamped. It is probably one of the more ugly truths that Titanic brought to the forefront. Courage, empathy, human compassion seemed to have vanished and unfortunately Captain Smiths final edict of “every man for himself” became the rule and not the exception.  Over 400 people might have been saved had the boats returned, but only one did, and then it was too late.

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